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BC wants cleanup at Tulsequah Chief Mine

BC wants cleanup at Tulsequah Chief Mine

The BC government has told the owners of a mothballed mine near Yukon and Alaska borders to clean up their act.

The Tulsequah Chief mine, located approximately 100 kilometres south of Atlin, has been on care and maintenance since June, 2012.

Recent inspections by the province revealed that it was not in compliance with some provincial permits.

One concern noted in the inspection report is that acidic discharge water from the mine was draining directly into the Tulsequah River, a tributary of the Taku River which flows into Alaska.

Inspection report photo shows acid drainage into Tulsequah River (Government of BC)

Government inspection report photo shows acid drainage into Tulsequah River (Government of BC)

Environmental groups like Rivers Without Borders have long been critical of pollution and potentially acid-generating rock left over from the previous operations of the mine dating back to the 1950s.

Chieftain Metals constructed a mine water acid treatment plant in October, 2011 as part of its efforts to redevelop the mine, but the plant was shut down the following June because of problems with the system.

The company has three months to respond to the concerns of the province’s inspection report.

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