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Home / 2017 / First Nations commending hunters turning in their grizzly tags as the season begins

First Nations commending hunters turning in their grizzly tags as the season begins
PHOTOGRAPH BY RONAN DONOVAN, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

First Nations commending hunters turning in their grizzly tags as the season begins

As the fall grizzly hunt opens first nations are reiterating their stance on the trophy hunt.

Both the Coastal First Nations and the Central Coast Bear working group are pleased the NDP has put an end to the trophy hunt, but they are allowing the hunt this season to precede because the previous liberal government had already issued permits for this years hunt. The government will however, stop the hunt as of this November.

Some hunters have turned in their hunting tags to show their respect for the Coastal First Nations trophy hunt ban they put in place under Indigenous Law. Before this season opened, one such hunter surrendered their tag to the Heiltsuk Nation.

Jess Housty a Heiltsuk Tribal Councilor and a member of the Coastal First Nations Board says First Nations have applauded individual hunters like the one who turned in their tags for taking a stand and for following their moral compass. Housty was the councilor who accepted the tag and thanked the hunter who complied with Indigenous Law and saved the life of a grizzly.

During this season, the Coastal Guardian Watchmen will continue to monitor and implement the coastal ban, which has been in place since 2012. Bear working group member Chief Douglas Neasloss says trophy hunting is closed in the Great Bear Rainforest for good.

Housty adds the First Nations have made it crystal clear that even as Victoria works to bring their regulations on line, the original rights holders and title holders have long banned the trophy hunt in the rain forest and that ban will stand.

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