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Home / 2017 / Port of Prince Rupert chosen as monitoring station for human impact study

Port of Prince Rupert chosen as monitoring station for human impact study

Port of Prince Rupert chosen as monitoring station for human impact study

The Government of Canada has announced $50.8-million to help assess the impacts of human activities on our coastline.

The money will go towards a Coastal Environmental Baseline Program. Scientists from DFO, Indigenous and community partners will collect baseline data in six areas of the country where there is existing or potential increase in vessel traffic.

By studying the current state of these areas, they can better detect changes in the environment and improve our understanding of the effects of human activity on the marine environment over time, according to the release.

One of those ports will be the Port of Prince Rupert.

Vancouver will make up the second area on the west coast. There will be two on the east coast, Saint John NB and Placentia Bay NL, as well as on the St. Lawrence in Quebec and the sixth monitoring spot will be in the Arctic.

The data collected will be used for decision making that could impact sensitive marine habitats and species.

Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard Dominic LeBlanc says, “Our Government is taking action to reduce the impacts of human activities on our coastal marine environments. The Coastal Environmental Baseline Program will support evidence-based decisions that will guide economic growth while preserving our marine ecosystems for future generations.”

This announcement was made during the World Environmental Education Congress where Canada officially joined the CleanSeas campaign, a UN initiative to eliminate major sources of marine litter, further solidifying its commitment to keeping our oceans cleaned.

About Ashley Anthony

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